The Wild Flower Calendar

20 June 2014 // Mathew Clayton //The Wild Flower Calendar

June: Horse Chestnut Illustration: Greg Stevenson Words: Mathew Clayton The horse chestnut tree has the most extraordinary flowers that we often don’t appreciate because they grow above eye level. Frilly with dots of yellow and red they remind me of decorative pieces of ceramic that graced sideboards and mantlepieces in the 1970s. If they were […]

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The Wild Flower Calendar

29 April 2014 // Mathew Clayton //The Wild Flower Calendar

April: Lesser Celandine Illustration: Greg Stevenson Words: Mathew Clayton Pilewort sounds like the name of a New Wave of Heavy Metal bands that Sounds championed in the 1980s, but is in fact a common name of the lesser celandine, a small yellow flower currently massing underneath hedgerows and along damp grass verges. A harbinger of […]

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The Wild Flower Calendar

10 February 2014 // Mathew Clayton //The Wild Flower Calendar

January: Snowdrop Illustration: Greg Stevenson Words: Mathew Clayton I spotted my first flowers of the year two weekend’s ago in the local churchyard: a single snowdrop growing at the foot of a tree. I stopped for a minute to look and involuntarily found myself smiling. Snowdrops are beautifully proportioned, the flower just the right size […]

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Wild Berry Calendar – Mistletoe

30 December 2013 // The Wild Flower Calendar

Illustration: Greg Stevenson Words: Mathew Clayton ‘On the sixth day of the moon… A priest arrayed in white vestments climbs the tree and, with a golden sickle, cuts down the mistletoe, which is caught in a white cloak’. This flowery description of a supposed druid ceremony, written by Pliny the Elder in the first century […]

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The Wild Flower Calendar

5 December 2013 // The Wild Flower Calendar

November: Gorse Illustration: Greg Stevenson Words: Mathew Clayton There was an air of malevolence on the Downs when I went for a run today. At the top, out of breath, I stopped for a minute and took in the view. A milky blue fog hung across the Ouse valley. A large fire was burning in […]

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